The analytics for microparticles in water is a formidable challenge; standard sampling and analytical methods have not yet been established. Masses of large waste plastics floating in the oceans have been an issue of concern for many years. More recently, microplastic particles have been detected in seawater, freshwaters and drinking waters, including bottled waters and foods. Environmental plastics are a risk to aquatic organisms from ingestion; they are unsightly and indicative of gross mismanagement of disposal of plastic wastes. Plastics degrade very slowly over many years, and eventually  produce microparticles generally roughly in the size range of  about  1 to 10 µm (micrometer or micron, 1/1,000,000 of a meter) to perhaps as large as 5 mm (millimeter, 1/1,000 of a meter). Particles smaller than 1 µm could be called nanoparticles. Microplastic particles in surface freshwaters and especially treated drinking waters tend to be in the smaller size ranges  (considerably less than 100 µm). Apart from larger sea animals mistakenly ingesting large pieces, fish flesh has been found to contain plastic particles and filter feeders like clams and oysters can accumulate plastic micro...