Nasa has held a grand reopening of its Mission Control room from the Apollo days after it was meticulously restored to the way it looked 50 years ago. The site at Johnson Space Centre in Houston was last used for space shuttle flights in the 1990s, and has been recreated down to the carpeting, wallpaper, glass ashtrays and retro coffee cups. The reopening caps years of work and millions in donations, and it opens to the public on Monday, weeks before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Gone is the haze of cigarette, cigar and pipe smoke, as well as the coffee, drinks and pizza stains, from 1969 when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon. From ceiling tiles to ashtrays, the Apollo Mission Control Center has been restored to appear as it did in 1969, in time to celebrate the #Apollo50th anniversaries. This National Landmark reminds us of our achievements & inspires us to continue exploring. https://t.co/FAAKBLGUNT pic.twitter.com/qctF2NLU5W It was given the stamp of approval from retired flight director Gene Kranz, a man for whom failure — or even a minor oversight — was never an option. But, seated at the console where he ruled over Apollo 11 and ...